Hip-Hop And The American Jihadist Version 2.0

Adam GadahnLast year I wrote a short article on my blog titled Hip Hop & Extreme Islam. The focus was a recruitment video showing members of the Al-Qaeda backed Somalia terror group, Al-Shabaab, and produced by “The As-Sahab Foundation for Islamic Media Production”, which is Al-Qaedas media division. The word “al-shabaab” translates to “the Youth” in Arabic and is more commonly known as The Movement For Warrior Youth.

The propaganda video used rap lyrics and hip hop music to attract and recruit disenchanted Muslim youth from westernized countries to the terror group.

Who Runs As-Sahab?

His American name is Adam Godahn, but he is simply known as “Azzam the American”. He is purportedly the (HJIC) head jihadist in charge of the As-Sahab Foundation for Islamic Media Publication, which uses modern technology to produce “documentary style” videos about Al-Qaeda’s operations, and to recruit militants.  

Watch the video now:

(lyrics)

“Bomb by bomb, blast by blast, only gonna bring back the glorious past.”
 
“Land by land, war by war, only gonna make our black flag soar.”

“The American dream has fallen, Bush is going down like Stalin, the economy is crawlin’, the widows are bawlin’, you dead you be haulin’, while our takbeers (chants of Allah is Great) keep callin’.”

Abu Mansour al-Amriki (Omar Hammami), 26, who can be heard recanting lyrics in the second video is not to be confused with Azzam al-Amriki (Adam Gadahn), 31. They do however share many similarities and have both been featured in al-Shabaab’s recruitment videos. They’re white American men who converted to Islam from Christianity. They’ve both appealed openly to Americans to answer the call for holy war against those they consider to be enemies of radical Islam. Abu Mansour al-Amriki was attracted to the promise of a pure Islamic state in civil war ridden Somalia where he’s currently based. This desire has long been a central component of the ideology behind Al-Qaeda’s relentless attacks and a key reason for the current “holy” war against Americans and non-believers.

The two men are often confused not only because of the similarities surrounding their allegiance to radical Islam, but also because of their adopted aliases, shared country of birth and aim, which is to recruit Islamic extremists and young Muslim American men by any means possible.

So Just Who Is Adam Gadahn? <– Click for story by the NY Post.

He has a one million dollar bounty on his head courtesy of the US government. He’s also the first American to be charged with treason since World War II. He appeared in a video that surfaced this past Sunday where he urged Muslims in America to carry out terrorist attacks. 

Adam Gadahn Not Really In Custody?

Conflicting reports surfaced over the weekend about Gadahn’s supposed capture and arrest in Pakistan over. The conflict was due to inconsistencies among Pakistani officials on who exactly they have in custody.

Although two officers and a government official identified the man as Adam, a different official said the suspect is American with the alias Abu Yahya Majadin al-Adam. This alias is also know to have been used by Adam Gadahn.

The name similarities may have caused initial confusion, but reports of his arrest and identity remain unconfirmed at present time. In fact, he is not believed to be in custody, but another American is, according to officials.

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Comments

4 Responses to “Hip-Hop And The American Jihadist Version 2.0”
  1. thesauros says:

    Here is something that shows Islamic men who are definitely not disenchanted. They are very much into their religon. Click on the video at the following link and watch Mohommad’s followers of “peaceful” islam carrying out his instructions – direct from the Quran.

    http://somalisforjesus.blogspot.com/2009/01/mansu

    If you censor comments to your posts, what is it exactly that you’re afraid of?

  2. Knowledge says:

    Thesauros,

    Thank you for your comment, although there should be a warning accompanying the link you included. The video is a terrible and horrifying thing to watch and I do not recommend anyone with a weak heart watch it.

    Just so there is no confusion about my viewpoints.

    I firmly believe:

    1. Some Muslims are terrorists.

    2. Some Christians are terrorists.

    3. Religion is not the major cause of terrorism, people are.

    4. I respect other's beliefs and whatever religion they follow, as long as they're not willfully harming others for not believing the same.

    5. I believe most, if not all religions help people to discover their power through faith and love.

    I do appreciate the light you shined into the seriousness of the situation in parts of Somalia, especially the terror and persecution inflicted by the militant group, Al-Shabaab.

    p.s. I do not censor comments, I censor SPAM. Once your very first comment is approved, all of your following comments are automatically approved.

  3. Philly Femme says:

    Good post, but I think that there is an aspect that’s a little more relevant for a lot of us here at home, which is the role that Islamic-influenced or Muslim made hip hop had in bringing people from the hood to Islam in the 90s, and what sort of Islam has found a home in our neighborhoods and community. Some of those old groups were Poor Righteous Teachers, X Clan, Brand Nubian, but also just the fact that the people in Tribe were Muslim was definitely an influence. Salafi Islam, as practiced by Blackamericans and reaching its peak in the late 1990s gave us an Islam where our daughters were “married off” at 14, 15, 16 to men in their late 20s with no jobs other than selling oils on the streets or “doing dawah.” In some cities, like Philly, KC, a lot of guys have turned Islam into their own form of a gang, bringing a lot of dysfunction, spouting extremist ideas, telling women they should cover their whole bodies – even our eyes, while having children with all “baby mamas” saying “It’s polygamy, we’re allowed to do this.”

    I don’t think many or any of those old school hip hop artists were or are now Salafi, but the language and imagery of Islam had such a huge impact on so many of us exploring Islam and eventually getting caught up into that.

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